Please select a Date, Category or Tag

The buck passing stops here on European norms for drones

October 11, 2018

By Delina Goxho   The most recent Trump administration changes to the policies regulating drone strikes are still secret, but what we do know sets a dangerous precedent on the use of armed drones and the use of force broadly, with strong implications to the USA as well as Europe. . The current U.S. policy … Continue reading “The buck passing stops here on European norms for drones”


Henry: a wounded soldier forgotten by all in an American jail – by all except his brothers who fell beside him in Vietnam – Part II

August 7, 2018

By Charles Bloeser The former soldier grimaced for just an instant as he lowered himself into a Spartan metal chair opposite mine in this cramped space we shared. A chair like the one he’d lowered himself into for his monitored telephone call with his wife. Their relationship described in Hebrew scriptures as one in which … Continue reading “Henry: a wounded soldier forgotten by all in an American jail – by all except his brothers who fell beside him in Vietnam – Part II”


Henry: a wounded soldier forgotten by all in an American jail – by all except his brothers who fell beside him in Vietnam – Part I

August 2, 2018

By Charles Bloeser Henry[i] was a veteran who nearly died from combat injuries in Vietnam.  In his dreams, his platoon mates repeatedly kicked him and struck him, screaming at Henry that it was his fault that they were dead. His fault that their children were now orphans. When it all became too much for him, … Continue reading “Henry: a wounded soldier forgotten by all in an American jail – by all except his brothers who fell beside him in Vietnam – Part I”


Strife Series on Cyberwarfare and State Perspectives, Part III – The argument for a more critical analysis on the United States

July 23, 2018

By Shivali Bhatt A critical line of argument regarding cyber warfare today is how it has supposedly brought about contextual changes that challenge the balance of power in the international system. The broad consensus is that large, powerful states, like the United States, are losing leverage against those – traditionally – deemed small and weak. … Continue reading “Strife Series on Cyberwarfare and State Perspectives, Part III – The argument for a more critical analysis on the United States”


Strife Series on Cyberwarfare and State Perspectives, Part II – Deception in Cyberspace: Nation States and False Flag operations

July 19, 2018

Examining the use and effects of false flags in nation state cyberattacks, and how geopolitical analysis may be add value to attribution efforts. By Amy Ertan   ‘The Problem of Attribution’ The problems with cyber attribution form a labyrinth that continue to trouble all those involved in cyber defence and wider security. The challenges determining … Continue reading “Strife Series on Cyberwarfare and State Perspectives, Part II – Deception in Cyberspace: Nation States and False Flag operations”


NATO is wounded, this Summit could break it

July 12, 2018

By Dr Zachary Wolfraim In light of the recent chaos consuming British politics and the looming NATO summit, I revisited an article I wrote on the eve of the US election in 2016 hoping it would outline a worst-case scenario, rather than reality. At that time, NATO was heading into uncertainty with the reality of Brexit … Continue reading “NATO is wounded, this Summit could break it”


Strife Feature – Political leaders with military backgrounds: a comparison of India and the US

June 25, 2018

by Saawani Raje The US and India are similar nations in many respects. They have both had fairly stable trajectories of progress in the course of their democratic histories. Covering large areas of geographical territory, they are both nationalistic territorial nations with a colonial past. Significantly, they both have a history of successful civilian rule … Continue reading “Strife Feature – Political leaders with military backgrounds: a comparison of India and the US”


Why the Terminator might turn out to be Chinese: China’s bid for an AI-empowered military

April 13, 2018

By Clément Briens Science fiction’s portrayal of Artificial Intelligence (AI) has very often been centered on the fear of “killer robots” almost always often manufactured by the United States (US) government. The malevolent Skynet AI in the Terminator franchise, for instance, is developed by Cyberdyne Systems, a US military contractor. The AI in I, Robot … Continue reading “Why the Terminator might turn out to be Chinese: China’s bid for an AI-empowered military”


The Cyber Espionage Predominant Purpose Test

March 22, 2018

By Jessica “Zhanna” Malekos Smith   While ‘spying’ may strike some as indecorous state behaviour, it is essentially akin to a bodily function, like sneezing, that is necessary to sustaining the health of the body politic. But can international law meaningfully distinguish between cyberespionage for national security purposes and economic espionage? According to former U.S. Treasury … Continue reading “The Cyber Espionage Predominant Purpose Test”


Book Review: ‘Blinking Red: Crisis and Compromise in American Intelligence after 9/11’

March 7, 2018

Reviewed by Ioana Ilie   Michael Allen, Blinking Red: Crisis and Compromise in American Intelligence after 9/11. USA, University of Nebraska Press, Potomac Books, Inc., 2013. ISBN: 978-1-61234-823-0. Pp. 280. Paperback. £13.99.   Michael Allen’s book Blinking Red attempts to be the authoritative legislative history of the U.S. Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act (IRTPA) … Continue reading “Book Review: ‘Blinking Red: Crisis and Compromise in American Intelligence after 9/11’”


Filter

By Date:




By Categories:




By Tags:



  • Share this

    Copyright © 2018 Strife Blog. All Rights Reserved.

    Designed by Kris Chan