Please select a Date, Category or Tag

Book Review: Bremmer, Ian (2015), Superpower: Three Choices for America’s Role in the World

August 15, 2016

Reviewed by: Alexandria Reid Bremmer, I. Superpower: Three Choices for America’s Role in the World, ( London: Portfolio Penguin), 2015. ISBN:978 0 24121 677 4 In his latest book, written with America’s 2016 election in mind, policy pundit and LinkedIn favourite Ian Bremmer laid out three competing visions of America’s future role in the world. Deliberately … Continue reading “Book Review: Bremmer, Ian (2015), Superpower: Three Choices for America’s Role in the World”


Book review: 'America’s Modern Wars: Understanding Iraq, Afghanistan and Vietnam' by Christopher Lawrence

May 23, 2016

Reviewed by: Cheng Lai Ki Christopher Lawrence. America’s Modern Wars: Understanding Iraq, Afghanistan and Vietnam. Oxford, UK. Casemate Publishers, 2015. ISBN: 978-1612002781. Hardcover. £19.99 Compared to other countries around the world, the United States military possesses the largest expenditure rate in the world of around $640,221million, according to a study conducted by the Brookings in 2014.[1] … Continue reading “Book review: 'America’s Modern Wars: Understanding Iraq, Afghanistan and Vietnam' by Christopher Lawrence”


The Libya Complex: From International Interference to Impotence

March 2, 2016

By: Laura Hawkes When attempting to formulate an effective international response to conflicts the crucial question looms: what comes first, diplomacy or eliminating an insurgency? In the context of Libya, this inevitable question has haunted the international community, causing stalled reactions rendering their positions weak. In the aftermath of the 2011 Libyan revolution which saw … Continue reading “The Libya Complex: From International Interference to Impotence”


A war on humanitarianism?

November 19, 2015

By: Mélanie Thienard   Is the United States waging a war on humanitarianism? On 26 October 2015, a Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) hospital in Northern Yemen was struck by airstrikes, allegedly conducted by the US-supported, Saudi-led coalition, who have denied any implication in the destruction of the hospital. Earlier that month, on the 3rd of October, … Continue reading “A war on humanitarianism?”


The Question of Limited Intervention in Syria: ‘And Then What?’

October 26, 2015

By: Alexander Decina Given the atrocities witnessed during the course of the Syrian civil war—be it the Bashar al-Assad regime’s use of barrel bombs or the depravity of the so-called Islamic State—it is hardly surprising to hear continued frustration at U.S. and Western inaction. Some have estimated the death toll to be higher than 250,000—a number … Continue reading “The Question of Limited Intervention in Syria: ‘And Then What?’”


Why won’t the USA leave the Persian Gulf? The story of the ultimate ‘frenemies'

December 15, 2014

By Mazhid Kat: In 1945 Franklin Roosevelt was the first President to admit that the United States had become oil-dependent.[i] This occurred because the American government had introduced a ‘conservation policy’ aimed at reducing the production of domestic oil and saving reserves for future generations by substituting it with imports.[ii] As a result, Roosevelt and King … Continue reading “Why won’t the USA leave the Persian Gulf? The story of the ultimate ‘frenemies'”


Could protracted conflict in Syria be in the national interest of the United States?

April 1, 2014

By Eugenio Lilli: In a recent talk I chaired at King’s College London, a prominent American expert on US foreign policy described the crisis in Syria as a ‘no good option crisis’ for the United States. Similarly, in a February piece on the web magazine War On The Rocks, the authors argued that, ‘With chemical … Continue reading “Could protracted conflict in Syria be in the national interest of the United States?”


Carrots or sticks? The future of U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East

November 2, 2012

By Lorena Fortuno The role of the United States:  Changes in Middle East Foreign Policy Since the early stages of the Cold War, one of the main policy goals of the United States has been to promote and maintain its influence in the Middle East in order to gain access to a stable oil market. … Continue reading “Carrots or sticks? The future of U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East”


Filter

By Date:




By Categories:




By Tags:



  • Share this

    Copyright © 2018 Strife Blog. All Rights Reserved.

    Designed by Kris Chan