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Where Evil met its End

June 7, 2019

by Miles Vining 7 June 2019 Our relief group provided humanitarian assistance to people fleeing the last stronghold of ISIS in Baghouz, Syria. In Feburary and March 2019 we fed over 25,000 and treated over 4,000 wounded. These were mostly ISIS families, a number of which were in critical condition from the fighting and air … Continue reading “Where Evil met its End”


Widows and Children of the Caliphate’s Last Stand

May 9, 2019

By Miles Vining 9 April 2019 “She soaked a big rag with bright red blood. We put a new one on and it soaked up a whole rag again within two minutes, bleeding a lot. Does that anti… Elliah, what do we do?….”. Our Chief Medic Elliah responds over the radio sets with, “Okay, is … Continue reading “Widows and Children of the Caliphate’s Last Stand”


Just Who Are the YPG?

October 22, 2018

By Ed Nash 22 October 2018     Donald Trump recently praised what he described as the sacrifice of Kurds in the fight against ISIS across Iraq and Syria to the international press. His declaration was made shortly after the State Department removed the previous rather limited reference to the Syrian Kurdish militias known as … Continue reading “Just Who Are the YPG?”


Strife Series on United Nations Peacekeeping, Part I – The Fate of UN Peacekeeping and the Changing Tides of Geopolitics

April 3, 2018

By Dr Samir Puri The UN’s viability to act as a peacekeeping force for good is always constrained by geopolitics. When the geopolitical tides change – as they evidently are in the twenty-first century, with the rise of China, the resurgence of Russia, and other developments – the UN feels the impact. When it comes … Continue reading “Strife Series on United Nations Peacekeeping, Part I – The Fate of UN Peacekeeping and the Changing Tides of Geopolitics”


The limits of US security cooperation in Jordan

April 22, 2016

By: Peter Kirechu The most notable feature of President Barack Obama’s partnership-based counterterrorism doctrine­–roughly defined–is its central focus on training and arming local security services to independently deal with emerging terrorism threats. The President’s doctrine is unfortunately fraught with inconsistent performance of US-trained security services, especially among fragile states in the Middle East and beyond. … Continue reading “The limits of US security cooperation in Jordan”


Putin’s sleight of hand in Syria

April 15, 2016

By: Peter Kirechu On March 14, Russian President Vladimir Putin unexpectedly announced the withdrawal of Russian forces from Syria as UN-sponsored peace talks began in Geneva. Putin’s withdrawal–however partial–challenged the Obama administration’s long-held quagmire sentence on the Russian role inside Syria. Putin showed that a limited military campaign could preserve the regime from collapse without … Continue reading “Putin’s sleight of hand in Syria”


A ‘Second Hezbollah’: The strategic value of Iran’s proxy warfare policy in Syria

April 13, 2016

By: Robert Andrea Throughout the past thirty years, Iran has arguably been the world’s foremost expert in the use of so-called ‘proxy’ warfare as a tool of statecraft. Whether in Lebanon, Gaza, Yemen, or Iraq, Tehran has displayed a degree of discipline about its use of ‘proxy’ sponsorship hitherto unmatched by few, if any, other … Continue reading “A ‘Second Hezbollah’: The strategic value of Iran’s proxy warfare policy in Syria”


PROXY Capabilities – The History and Future of Russian Private Military Companies

April 5, 2016

This is the second of a series of articles we will be featuring on Strife in the coming week looking at the role of Proxy Warfare in the 21st century by Series Editor Cheng Lai Ki. Previous articles in the series can be found here. By: Gregory Wilson On the eve of the Russo-Georgian War of 2008, … Continue reading “PROXY Capabilities – The History and Future of Russian Private Military Companies”


ISIS and the Flood: the hydro-politics behind the rise (and fall) of Daesh

March 25, 2016

EDITORS NOTE: This is the fourth and final article in a four-part series which explores the role of water in human conflict and politics. The series marks (though is not affiliated with) World Water Day 2016, a UN initiative to promote awareness of water issues. More information on World Water Day can be found here. … Continue reading “ISIS and the Flood: the hydro-politics behind the rise (and fall) of Daesh”


ISIS and its conduct of war: interview with Professor Dr. Albert A. Stahel

February 12, 2016

By: Annabelle Vuille Professor Dr. Albert A. Stahel is the founder and head of the Swiss think tank Institut für Strategische Studien [Institute for Strategic Studies]. He has taught strategic studies at the Military Academy of the ETH Zürich and holds the title of honorary professor in the same field at the University of Zürich. … Continue reading “ISIS and its conduct of war: interview with Professor Dr. Albert A. Stahel”


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