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NATO is wounded, this Summit could break it

July 12, 2018

By Dr Zachary Wolfraim In light of the recent chaos consuming British politics and the looming NATO summit, I revisited an article I wrote on the eve of the US election in 2016 hoping it would outline a worst-case scenario, rather than reality. At that time, NATO was heading into uncertainty with the reality of Brexit … Continue reading “NATO is wounded, this Summit could break it”


Saudi Arabia: The Wind of Change?

April 30, 2018

By Roisin Murray With a historical legacy as the foremost theocratic state in the Sunni Muslim sphere, political developments in Saudi Arabia that threaten to challenge its conservative, religious identity are significant.[1] The domestic situation of Saudi Arabia is a concern for many foreign governments; states worldwide are reliant on Saudi oil, and Saudi Arabia is … Continue reading “Saudi Arabia: The Wind of Change?”


Sino-North Korean relationship: a rivalry in brewing?

March 29, 2018

By Yiming Yu   Interactions between China and North Korea always attract attention, particularly in the time of crisis. When Song Tao, a senior Chinese diplomat, visited the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) in November 2017, to inform the outcome of Communist Party’s 19th Congress, the reports on this visit raised many observers’ eyebrows … Continue reading “Sino-North Korean relationship: a rivalry in brewing?”


The Cyber Espionage Predominant Purpose Test

March 22, 2018

By Jessica “Zhanna” Malekos Smith   While ‘spying’ may strike some as indecorous state behaviour, it is essentially akin to a bodily function, like sneezing, that is necessary to sustaining the health of the body politic. But can international law meaningfully distinguish between cyberespionage for national security purposes and economic espionage? According to former U.S. Treasury … Continue reading “The Cyber Espionage Predominant Purpose Test”


Kim Jong-un’s Winter Charm Offensive: Another Attempt of Duping Seoul

March 14, 2018

By Davis Florick   While North Korea’s participation in the 2018 Winter Olympics and its recent government-to-government meeting with South Korean officials are both positive developments, no one should forget that Pyongyang has a long history of attempting to manipulate Seoul. On three occasions, the Kim regime pursued extensive engagement with South Korea. North Korea’s … Continue reading “Kim Jong-un’s Winter Charm Offensive: Another Attempt of Duping Seoul”


Strife Series on National Perspectives in North-East Asian Rivalries, Part I – The view from Pyongyang

January 19, 2018

By Ashley Ryan     The view from Pyongyang is fundamentally different than that of the West. Pyongyang has not only a more monolithic perspective than that of London or Washington (the natural consequence of any dictatorship), it is a culturally and qualitatively dissimilar viewpoint. In order to analyse the outlook of the Democratic People’s Republic … Continue reading “Strife Series on National Perspectives in North-East Asian Rivalries, Part I – The view from Pyongyang”


Libya’s civil war & the importance of strategic sequencing

May 6, 2016

By: Robert Andrea One of the most overlooked aspects in strategic deliberations is that of sequencing. It is much more common for the ‘what’ and the ‘how’ of a policy to receive the lion’s share of analysis. Despite this, the order in which the segments of a strategy are implemented can often be just as … Continue reading “Libya’s civil war & the importance of strategic sequencing”


Transboundary rivers and climate change: Testing times for hydro-diplomacy to attain and maintain cooperation

March 24, 2016

EDITORS NOTE: This is the third article in a four-part series which explores the role of water in human conflict and politics. The series marks (though is not affiliated with) World Water Day 2016, a UN initiative to promote awareness of water issues. More information on World Water Day can be found here. The first … Continue reading “Transboundary rivers and climate change: Testing times for hydro-diplomacy to attain and maintain cooperation”


Why is Saudi Arabia Helping Iran’s Hardliners?

January 21, 2016

By: Alexander Decina There is an abundance of Middle East analysts and experts drawn to the idea of eternal conflicts. After the 2003 U.S. invasion of Iraq, they learned the words “Sunni” and “Shia” and decided that this “1,400 year-old fight” is the defining conflict in the Middle East, disregarding the nuance of the important issues … Continue reading “Why is Saudi Arabia Helping Iran’s Hardliners?”


The embattled and weary Two-State Solution is still the only game in town

November 2, 2015

By: Charles P. Kirchofer With the Oslo Accords all but dead and support for a two-state solution declining among both Israelis and Palestinians, it is tempting to abandon the idea altogether. There is no conceivable alternative, however. The longer two states are not a reality in Israel/Palestine, the worse things will become—especially for Israel. In … Continue reading “The embattled and weary Two-State Solution is still the only game in town”


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