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Strife Series on Cyberwarfare and State Perspectives, Part III – The argument for a more critical analysis on the United States

July 23, 2018

By Shivali Bhatt A critical line of argument regarding cyber warfare today is how it has supposedly brought about contextual changes that challenge the balance of power in the international system. The broad consensus is that large, powerful states, like the United States, are losing leverage against those – traditionally – deemed small and weak. … Continue reading “Strife Series on Cyberwarfare and State Perspectives, Part III – The argument for a more critical analysis on the United States”


Strife Series on Cyberwarfare and State Perspectives, Part II – Deception in Cyberspace: Nation States and False Flag operations

July 19, 2018

Examining the use and effects of false flags in nation state cyberattacks, and how geopolitical analysis may be add value to attribution efforts. By Amy Ertan   ‘The Problem of Attribution’ The problems with cyber attribution form a labyrinth that continue to trouble all those involved in cyber defence and wider security. The challenges determining … Continue reading “Strife Series on Cyberwarfare and State Perspectives, Part II – Deception in Cyberspace: Nation States and False Flag operations”


Strife Series on Cyberwarfare and State Perspectives, Part I – Offensive Cyber Capabilities and Medium Powers: Two Case Studies

July 17, 2018

By Andreas Haggman   Introduction In recent years, traditional military capabilities have been supplemented by the development of offensive cyber capabilities. Examples of cyber capabilities have proved that effects can be achieved in both the kinetic (e.g. Stuxnet, Black Energy) and information spheres (e.g. Crimea, TV5 Monde). However, discussions in this area are often predictable … Continue reading “Strife Series on Cyberwarfare and State Perspectives, Part I – Offensive Cyber Capabilities and Medium Powers: Two Case Studies”


Why the Terminator might turn out to be Chinese: China’s bid for an AI-empowered military

April 13, 2018

By Clément Briens Science fiction’s portrayal of Artificial Intelligence (AI) has very often been centered on the fear of “killer robots” almost always often manufactured by the United States (US) government. The malevolent Skynet AI in the Terminator franchise, for instance, is developed by Cyberdyne Systems, a US military contractor. The AI in I, Robot … Continue reading “Why the Terminator might turn out to be Chinese: China’s bid for an AI-empowered military”


The Cyber Espionage Predominant Purpose Test

March 22, 2018

By Jessica “Zhanna” Malekos Smith   While ‘spying’ may strike some as indecorous state behaviour, it is essentially akin to a bodily function, like sneezing, that is necessary to sustaining the health of the body politic. But can international law meaningfully distinguish between cyberespionage for national security purposes and economic espionage? According to former U.S. Treasury … Continue reading “The Cyber Espionage Predominant Purpose Test”


The Cyber Hangover: British cyber strategy before and after WannaCry

February 5, 2018

By Clément Briens This article is a follow-up to my previous blog entry, that examined French national cyber strategy, and which can be found here. More fear than harm The WannaCry ransomware that plagued the National Health Service (NHS) in May 2017 served as a wake-up call for many, as it demonstrated the vulnerability of the … Continue reading “The Cyber Hangover: British cyber strategy before and after WannaCry”


France Must Address its Threats in Cyberspace or Face the Consequences

November 30, 2017

By Clément Briens  Florence Parly, the new French Minister of the Armed Forces, now has the challenge of leading national strategy- where does cyber security situate in her administration’s vision of French security? (Credit: Wikimedia Commons)   On the 13th of October, the French Ministry of Defense, led by Florence Parly, Minister of the Armed … Continue reading “France Must Address its Threats in Cyberspace or Face the Consequences”


Cyber risks to governance, Part II – The Attribution Game: the challenges and opportunities of cyber attribution in policymaking

August 28, 2015

By Yuji Develle and Jackson Webster: In an era of Snowden, Wikileaks, Dark Web and data breaches there have never been so many cyber risks associated with governance. This article is the second of a 3-part Strife series which examines three diverse aspects of cyber risks to governance.  Last week Andreas Haggman began by looking at the online … Continue reading “Cyber risks to governance, Part II – The Attribution Game: the challenges and opportunities of cyber attribution in policymaking”


Surveillance, bulk data collection and intelligence. Interview with Bruce Schneier

June 5, 2015

Bruce Schneier is an internationally renowned security technologist and the author of 13 books — including “Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World” — as well as hundreds of articles, essays, and academic papers. Schneier is a fellow at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard … Continue reading “Surveillance, bulk data collection and intelligence. Interview with Bruce Schneier”


Cyber Security in China

November 7, 2014

By Christy Quinn:  Greg Austin, Cyber Policy in China. China Today. Cambridge, Malden: Polity Press, 2014. Pp. 232. £ 15.99, paperback; £50.00, hardback; £10.99, e-book. ISBN: 978-0-7456-6979-3. * From the emergence of the printing press in Early Modern Europe, to the expansion of global satellite television and the internet,the state has always been on the back foot in … Continue reading “Cyber Security in China”


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