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Hizbul Mujahideen in Assam: A non-existential threat

October 17, 2018

By M.A. Athul, published 17 October 2018   Assam, in Northeast India,  has been experienced a long spell of ethnic insurgency since 1979. Yet the state is witnessing a consolidation of peace and stability, (the insurgency related fatalities has fallen from 305 in 2014 to nine in 2018), with ethnic insurgent violence in its last leg. … Continue reading “Hizbul Mujahideen in Assam: A non-existential threat”


Strife Series on Counterterrorism and Human Rights, Part V – A perpetual state of emergency: the case of France

January 27, 2017

By: Silvia Sclafani In times of crisis, governments often impose a state of emergency in which national security takes priority over individual rights originally safeguarded by the state. A state of emergency and the ensuing heightened security measures are intended to last for a short period, during which the government attempts to secure the state and … Continue reading “Strife Series on Counterterrorism and Human Rights, Part V – A perpetual state of emergency: the case of France”


Strife Series on Counterterrorism and Human Rights, Part IV – Balances, trade-offs and divisions of labour in the strategy of countering terrorism

January 25, 2017

By: Samir Puri Balance. It takes just one word to convey the strategic essence of a national effort against terrorism. Trade-offs are inherent in its implementation. Policy responses to terrorism rest on tough judgement calls. One such dilemma is that of potential intrusion into privacy in order to boost the reach of security agencies. This … Continue reading “Strife Series on Counterterrorism and Human Rights, Part IV – Balances, trade-offs and divisions of labour in the strategy of countering terrorism”


Strife Series on Counterterrorism and Human Rights, Part II – Divergent counterterrorism strategies in France and the UK

January 19, 2017

By: Felix Manig The UK Foreign Office currently rates 47 countries around the world as highly likely targets for Islamist terrorist attacks. While this threat spans over much of the Middle East and North Africa, it also extends to Western countries such as the United Kingdom and France. While the threat of terrorism in the … Continue reading “Strife Series on Counterterrorism and Human Rights, Part II – Divergent counterterrorism strategies in France and the UK”


Strife Series on Counterterrorism and Human Rights, Introduction – Managing a delicate relationship

January 12, 2017

By: Felix Manig Countering and responding to the kind of terrorism which today plagues much of the Middle East, parts of Asia, and to a lesser extent Western states have become a massive undertaking and prime concern for policy-makers. The security of the individual is a basic human right which governments are entitled to protect; … Continue reading “Strife Series on Counterterrorism and Human Rights, Introduction – Managing a delicate relationship”


Extremism, environment, and new security dynamics: Strife in conversation with RUSI Director, Dr. Karin von Hippel

June 2, 2016

Interviewed by: Harris Kuemmerle Harris Kuemmerle – Where do you see climate change fitting within the wider European security dynamic moving forward? Do you feel that European policy makers adequately appreciate the security risks of climate change? Or is it still seen as somewhat of a secondary security issue? Karin von Hippel – I think … Continue reading “Extremism, environment, and new security dynamics: Strife in conversation with RUSI Director, Dr. Karin von Hippel”


Libya’s civil war & the importance of strategic sequencing

May 6, 2016

By: Robert Andrea One of the most overlooked aspects in strategic deliberations is that of sequencing. It is much more common for the ‘what’ and the ‘how’ of a policy to receive the lion’s share of analysis. Despite this, the order in which the segments of a strategy are implemented can often be just as … Continue reading “Libya’s civil war & the importance of strategic sequencing”


Does Malaysia have concrete counterterrorism strategies to mitigate potential terrorist attacks?

April 29, 2016

By: Munira Mustaffa While Indonesia successfully demonstrated remarkable resilience with her defiant cry of “Kami tidak takut” (“We are not intimidated”) on social media after the January 2016 attack,[1] there are some uncertainties that the same level of fortitude can be witnessed in Malaysia should a Daesh-inspired attack happen.[2] This raises some pressing debates about Malaysia’s … Continue reading “Does Malaysia have concrete counterterrorism strategies to mitigate potential terrorist attacks?”


The limits of US security cooperation in Jordan

April 22, 2016

By: Peter Kirechu The most notable feature of President Barack Obama’s partnership-based counterterrorism doctrine­–roughly defined–is its central focus on training and arming local security services to independently deal with emerging terrorism threats. The President’s doctrine is unfortunately fraught with inconsistent performance of US-trained security services, especially among fragile states in the Middle East and beyond. … Continue reading “The limits of US security cooperation in Jordan”


Neither Churchill nor Chamberlain: Time to Ditch the Munich Analogy

November 23, 2015

By Thomas Colley An article in yesterday’s Sunday Times set out British Prime Minister David Cameron’s plan to ‘bomb ISIS in a fortnight’.[1] The article, as is so common in today’s age of spin, premediates what Cameron is likely to say in the hope of controlling the debate on extending airstrikes into Syria before it … Continue reading “Neither Churchill nor Chamberlain: Time to Ditch the Munich Analogy”


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