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Internet Sovereignty as a Gateway to Global Norms: The Battle over Global Internet Governance

July 18, 2019

by Eve Gleeson 18 July 2019 Introduction The Internet’s essence as “open, global, [and] borderless” has complicated attempts toward international cooperation on Internet governance. Many authoritarian states with comprehensive cybersecurity policies and strategies regard the Internet as a tool to monitor and quell internal dissent that may threaten regime stability, while liberal democracies, especially those … Continue reading “Internet Sovereignty as a Gateway to Global Norms: The Battle over Global Internet Governance”


A Matter of Survival: How the Trade War will Shape China’s Future

May 2, 2019

By Francesca Ghiretti and Lloyd Yijue Liu 2 May 2019   The trade war between the US and China is more than what meets the eye, and this is not a mystery. In fact, besides the trade deficit, there are multiple aspects at stake: intellectual property rights, the opening of the Chinese market and most … Continue reading “A Matter of Survival: How the Trade War will Shape China’s Future”


India and Pakistan on the Brink of War at Jammu and Kashmir: What Role for China?

March 6, 2019

By Axel Dessein 6 March 2019 Next to the ongoing U.S.-China trade war and the premature ending of Donald Trump’s meeting with North Korea’s Kim Jong-un in Vietnam’s Hanoi, it seems somewhat odd that the risk of war between the two nuclear-armed countries India and Pakistan was only the third newsworthy item last week. In … Continue reading “India and Pakistan on the Brink of War at Jammu and Kashmir: What Role for China?”


Tactical Instability on the South China Sea and Sino-American Decoupling

October 30, 2018

By Axel Dessein 30 October 2018 In late September 2018, a Chinese Luyang-class destroyer nearly collided with the American destroyer U.S.S. Decatur during a Freedom of Navigation Operation (FONOP) in the South China Sea. These operations are essentially aimed at signalling a commitment to keeping the sea lanes open, the near-collision demonstrates that such commitments … Continue reading “Tactical Instability on the South China Sea and Sino-American Decoupling”


Why the Terminator might turn out to be Chinese: China’s bid for an AI-empowered military

April 13, 2018

By Clément Briens Science fiction’s portrayal of Artificial Intelligence (AI) has very often been centered on the fear of “killer robots” almost always often manufactured by the United States (US) government. The malevolent Skynet AI in the Terminator franchise, for instance, is developed by Cyberdyne Systems, a US military contractor. The AI in I, Robot … Continue reading “Why the Terminator might turn out to be Chinese: China’s bid for an AI-empowered military”


Sino-North Korean relationship: a rivalry in brewing?

March 29, 2018

By Yiming Yu   Interactions between China and North Korea always attract attention, particularly in the time of crisis. When Song Tao, a senior Chinese diplomat, visited the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) in November 2017, to inform the outcome of Communist Party’s 19th Congress, the reports on this visit raised many observers’ eyebrows … Continue reading “Sino-North Korean relationship: a rivalry in brewing?”


The Cyber Espionage Predominant Purpose Test

March 22, 2018

By Jessica “Zhanna” Malekos Smith   While ‘spying’ may strike some as indecorous state behaviour, it is essentially akin to a bodily function, like sneezing, that is necessary to sustaining the health of the body politic. But can international law meaningfully distinguish between cyberespionage for national security purposes and economic espionage? According to former U.S. Treasury … Continue reading “The Cyber Espionage Predominant Purpose Test”


Strife Series on National Perspectives in North-East Asian Rivalries, Part IV – Pyongyang: The View From Beijing

January 29, 2018

  By Riccardo Cociani There is nothing easy regarding Beijing’s strategic calculus about North Korea (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, DPRK). China’s difficult relationship with the DPRK rests upon balancing its vital interests: first, peace and stability on the Korean peninsula; second, its denuclearization; third, the preservation of its influential relationship with DPRK; fourth, crisis-prevention[1]. … Continue reading “Strife Series on National Perspectives in North-East Asian Rivalries, Part IV – Pyongyang: The View From Beijing”


Strife Series on National Perspectives in North-East Asian Rivalries, Part III – The Taiwan issue and mismatching identities: an ontological security perspective

January 25, 2018

By Dean Chen The Taiwan issue is concerned with the political status of Taiwan: whether it should reunify with Mainland China, declare independence as Republic of Taiwan, or maintain the status quo of being de facto independent but de jure remaining within the ‘One China’ framework. While mainstream perspectives focus on Taiwan’s geopolitical significance and … Continue reading “Strife Series on National Perspectives in North-East Asian Rivalries, Part III – The Taiwan issue and mismatching identities: an ontological security perspective”


Strife Series on National Perspectives in North-East Asian Rivalries, Part II – The view from Tokyo

January 22, 2018

By Andrea Fischetti Characterised as a peace-loving nation, Japan has earned this favourable international reputation through a combination of its culture and society. Also, the Constitution does not allow the country to possess offensive military capabilities.[1] Nonetheless, it is involved in territorial and political disputes with most of its neighbours, and at times, its foreign … Continue reading “Strife Series on National Perspectives in North-East Asian Rivalries, Part II – The view from Tokyo”


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