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The Role of History in the British and German Army Officer Corps: Training, Attitudes and Identity

September 18, 2018

By Dr Sarah Katharina Kayß     “Each nation steps into the future carrying the heritage of its own past. This past leaves its mark on the development of society, and on the way people think, including the way the military staff thinks.” (Vladimir Rukavishnikov 2007, 24)   The Study – the book In the … Continue reading “The Role of History in the British and German Army Officer Corps: Training, Attitudes and Identity”


Strife Feature – Political leaders with military backgrounds: a comparison of India and the US

June 25, 2018

by Saawani Raje The US and India are similar nations in many respects. They have both had fairly stable trajectories of progress in the course of their democratic histories. Covering large areas of geographical territory, they are both nationalistic territorial nations with a colonial past. Significantly, they both have a history of successful civilian rule … Continue reading “Strife Feature – Political leaders with military backgrounds: a comparison of India and the US”


‘For the Ashes of his Fathers, And the Temples of his Gods’. Or is it something else that makes a soldier fight? – Part II

May 5, 2018

By Sonia Bhatia and Kamaldeep Singh Sandhu   Introduction Part I of this article had argued that shared political views and motivations do not shape soldiers’ actions in battlefield. Instead, their actions are defined by more immediate things such as the group survival, deprivation, fatigue and fear for life and limb. In addition, it argued … Continue reading “‘For the Ashes of his Fathers, And the Temples of his Gods’. Or is it something else that makes a soldier fight? – Part II”


‘For the Ashes of his Fathers, And the Temples of his Gods’. Or is it something else that makes a soldier fight? – Part I

May 2, 2018

By Sonia Bhatia and Kamaldeep Singh Sandhu Introduction In the 6th century BC, during a battle between the armies of Rome and Clusium, a Roman officer Publius Horatius took a suicidal stand defending a bridge on river Tibre. His actions injured him permanently but saved the day for the city, as the delay he caused … Continue reading “‘For the Ashes of his Fathers, And the Temples of his Gods’. Or is it something else that makes a soldier fight? – Part I”


The Multi-Domain Battle Doctrine, or the Art of Gambling on Future Warfare

April 20, 2018

By Pierre Dugué In 2007, Secretary of Defence Robert Gates declared ‘We can expect that asymmetrical warfare will remain the mainstay of the contemporary battlefield for some time’. The United States (U.S.) considerably outweighs any military opponent. Hence, asymmetry appears to be a weapon of choice for competitors: terrorist groups in the Middle East and … Continue reading “The Multi-Domain Battle Doctrine, or the Art of Gambling on Future Warfare”


Will there be a coup in Venezuela?

December 11, 2017

By Will Bisset   It has come as a surprise to many that Venezuela’s military, with its history of attempted coups d’etat, has sat idly by while its country descends into chaos. Ostensibly, all the ingredients for the perfect coup are there: unprecedented shortages of basic goods such as food and medicine coupled with disastrous … Continue reading “Will there be a coup in Venezuela?”


The paradox of Brazil’s militarised public security

July 11, 2014

By Christoph Harig: Brazilian politicians have promised that the country would inherit lasting improvements from the World Cup. Among the many contested possible legacies, it is almost certain that the Armed Forces further enhanced their capability of performing domestic missions. About 57,000 soldiers took part in the 150,000-strong security force – the largest in the … Continue reading “The paradox of Brazil’s militarised public security”


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