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Does the History of Britain’s Relationship with Europe mean that Brexit was Inevitable?

July 26, 2019

by Ryan Chan 26 July 2019   In most analyses regarding the 2016 Referendum, Britain’s legacy of Exceptionalism and Empire is commonly cited as a crucial reason for the 2016 Referendum by critics and proponents alike. Yet this article will problematise the claim that Brexit was historically inevitable as it dismisses crucial explanations on the … Continue reading “Does the History of Britain’s Relationship with Europe mean that Brexit was Inevitable?”


Feature – Shabiha in Syria and Titushki in Ukraine as Elements of Authoritarian Control

July 15, 2019

by Daria Platonova 15 July 2019 Introduction Incumbent authoritarian regimes[1] can use a variety of tools to protect the status quo and their hold on power. Among those tools is the deployment of groups of armed civilians to disperse political protest that threatens to dislodge the regime and disrupt that status quo. A comparison can … Continue reading “Feature – Shabiha in Syria and Titushki in Ukraine as Elements of Authoritarian Control”


Feature — Winning the Disinformation War Against the West

May 12, 2019

By Andrzej Kozłowski 13 May 2019 The rapid expansion of the Internet in the nineties encouraged the expectation among Western politicians and experts that liberal democracy would come to dominate the world and authoritarian regimes would slowly collapse. It was hoped that the easy and fast access to uncensored information would strengthen civil society and opposition in … Continue reading “Feature — Winning the Disinformation War Against the West”


Feature — Putsch-ed Out of Power: After Sudan’s Coup d’Etat Set the Board, Where will the Pieces Move?

May 6, 2019

By Stephen Jones 7 May 2019 Part 1, with Analysis as of 13 April 2019 Following months of protests demanding the resignation of long-time Sudanese dictator Omar al-Bashir, he was removed from power by a military coup on Thursday, 11 April 2019. The coup, led by former allies of the President, is far from a … Continue reading “Feature — Putsch-ed Out of Power: After Sudan’s Coup d’Etat Set the Board, Where will the Pieces Move?”


Feature — Beyond the Strife and Rhetoric: Have the lights gone out for Theresa May’s Brexit Deal?

November 30, 2018

By Amber Boothe and Tasneem Ghazi 30 November 2018   The Shock of a Finalised Deal On the 14th November, in a moment of triumphant relief, Prime Minister Theresa May announced that the cabinet and the European Council had finally agreed to a ‘realistic Brexit Deal’. In her somber and resolute speech, May emphasised the … Continue reading “Feature — Beyond the Strife and Rhetoric: Have the lights gone out for Theresa May’s Brexit Deal?”


Bolsonaro Leads Brazil Into A Turbulent Future

November 13, 2018

By Felipe Leal Albuquerque  13 November 2018    Nearly two weeks after winning more than 55 percent of the vote, Jair Bolsonaro, the first extreme-right politician elected to the presidency in Brazil, vows to promote sweeping changes. Supported by around 57 million voters, the histrionic former Army captain showcased himself as an outsider while combining … Continue reading “Bolsonaro Leads Brazil Into A Turbulent Future”


Strife Feature – Elites and activists in Donetsk before the armed conflict

September 26, 2018

By Daria Platonova   The causes of war in eastern Ukraine (or between the Ukrainian government and Donetsk People’s Republic and Luhansk People’s Republic) have been interpreted in a wide variety of ways. Two main interpretations emerge: endogenous, that is an interpretation seeking indigenous roots of the conflict, and exogenous, that is looking at the … Continue reading “Strife Feature – Elites and activists in Donetsk before the armed conflict”


Strife Feature – The Incapable ‘Lone Ranger:’ Understanding Inequality and the Role of Interdependent Factors in the Onset of Violent Conflict

July 25, 2018

By Zach Beecher   Central to understanding the outbreak of violent conflict is the question of what propels the first combatant to pull the trigger and propel the force of his or her voice through the barrel of a gun.  Recent literature aims to understand the role of horizontal and vertical inequality in the initiation of … Continue reading “Strife Feature – The Incapable ‘Lone Ranger:’ Understanding Inequality and the Role of Interdependent Factors in the Onset of Violent Conflict”


Strife Feature – Political leaders with military backgrounds: a comparison of India and the US

June 25, 2018

by Saawani Raje The US and India are similar nations in many respects. They have both had fairly stable trajectories of progress in the course of their democratic histories. Covering large areas of geographical territory, they are both nationalistic territorial nations with a colonial past. Significantly, they both have a history of successful civilian rule … Continue reading “Strife Feature – Political leaders with military backgrounds: a comparison of India and the US”


L’impeachment che non fu. Tre appunti per i mesi a venire

June 10, 2018

by Andrea Varsori Per l’Italia, gli ultimi giorni del mese scorso sono stati estremamente movimentati, anche per gli standard a cui la politica nazionale e internazionale ci ha abituato negli ultimi anni. Tra il 28 e il 29 maggio, abbiamo assistito all’impennarsi di tensioni interne e esterne. Politici, osservatori e cittadini hanno preso parte a … Continue reading “L’impeachment che non fu. Tre appunti per i mesi a venire”


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