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Feature – Shabiha in Syria and Titushki in Ukraine as Elements of Authoritarian Control

July 15, 2019

by Daria Platonova 15 July 2019 Introduction Incumbent authoritarian regimes[1] can use a variety of tools to protect the status quo and their hold on power. Among those tools is the deployment of groups of armed civilians to disperse political protest that threatens to dislodge the regime and disrupt that status quo. A comparison can … Continue reading “Feature – Shabiha in Syria and Titushki in Ukraine as Elements of Authoritarian Control”


The Forgotten Casualties: The Indirect Gendered Consequences of Explosive Violence on Civilian Populations

July 9, 2019

by Miles Cameron Hunter 9 July 2019 Explosive violence is a feature of most contemporary armed conflicts. It comes in many forms: from mortars and airstrikes, to landmines and suicide bombings. Tragically, it is civilians who face the brunt. There is little sign of this trend abating: the casualty monitor run by Action on Armed … Continue reading “The Forgotten Casualties: The Indirect Gendered Consequences of Explosive Violence on Civilian Populations”


Ethics for the AI-Enabled Warfighter – The Human ‘Warrior-in-the-Design’

June 13, 2019

by J. Zhanna Malekos Smith 14 June 2019 Can a victor truly be crowned in the great power competition for artificial intelligence? According to Russian President Vladimir Putin, “whoever becomes the leader in this sphere will become the ruler of the world.” But the life of a state, much like that of a human being, is … Continue reading “Ethics for the AI-Enabled Warfighter – The Human ‘Warrior-in-the-Design’”


Game of Thrones and the Limitations of Narratives

June 10, 2019

by Thomas Colley 11 June 2019 WARNING: This article contains spoilers. Like millions of others, I have been contemplating the end of Game of Thrones. Being unable to stay awake until 2am UK time to watch episodes live, I have relied on pre-recording them to watch on subsequent days. It is remarkably difficult not to … Continue reading “Game of Thrones and the Limitations of Narratives”


Where Evil met its End

June 7, 2019

by Miles Vining 7 June 2019 Our relief group provided humanitarian assistance to people fleeing the last stronghold of ISIS in Baghouz, Syria. In Feburary and March 2019 we fed over 25,000 and treated over 4,000 wounded. These were mostly ISIS families, a number of which were in critical condition from the fighting and air … Continue reading “Where Evil met its End”


Volodymyr Zelenskiy and the Donbas Conflict in Ukraine

June 5, 2019

by Daria Platonova 5 June 2019 Volodymyr Zelenskiy’s[1] election to the presidency in Ukraine[2] has taken everyone by surprise. A former comedy actor and producer, Zelenskiy is widely seen as someone “outside the system,” despite having connections to the Ukrainian oligarchs. In the few interviews that he granted prior to the election, he acknowledged that the … Continue reading “Volodymyr Zelenskiy and the Donbas Conflict in Ukraine”


Peacekeepers in the Donbas: Pro et Contra

May 30, 2019

by Daria Platonova 31 May 2019 The conflict between the Ukrainian government and Russia-backed separatist republics of Donetsk and Luhansk[1] in the east of Ukraine (known as “the Donbas” or “Donbass” in Russian) has been raging since 2014. It started locally, when numerous anti-government protests in the Donbas were sparked by the radical changes of … Continue reading “Peacekeepers in the Donbas: Pro et Contra”


Chavez Versus Maduro: Who Did It Worse?

May 29, 2019

by Roisin Murray 29 May 2019 For most of the late twentieth-century, Venezuela was considered the most stable democracy in Latin America, held up as an example for its volatile Latin American neighbours. Venezuela is renowned for being a country rich in natural assets. It is a major producer of oil, as well as a … Continue reading “Chavez Versus Maduro: Who Did It Worse?”


Out of Balance: A Review of Women’s Rights in Myanmar

May 27, 2019

by Anna Plunkett 27 May 2019 Myanmar is a country that has sprung to global attention in the last few years, its seemingly self-led non-violent transition towards democracy was soon tarnished by the systematic ethnic cleansing of the country’s Rohingya Muslims in Rakhine State. At the epicentre of these storms has been Daw Aung San … Continue reading “Out of Balance: A Review of Women’s Rights in Myanmar”


EU Foreign Policy: More Grand Delusion than Grand Strategy

May 23, 2019

by Eliz Peck 24 May 2019 Henry Kissinger once said that “no foreign policy – no matter how ingenious – has any chance of success if it is born in the minds of a few and carried in the hearts of none”. With the EU divided not just between – but within – its member … Continue reading “EU Foreign Policy: More Grand Delusion than Grand Strategy”


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