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Rising Sun? Japanese Politics and the Shifting Nature of the U.S.-Japan Alliance.

November 8, 2019

by Adam Campbell 13 November 2019 ‘NATO countries must pay MORE, the United States must pay LESS. Very unfair’. @realDonaldTrump (10/07/2018). Since the beginning of his presidency, the American President Donald J. Trump has consistently stressed that America’s allies have not been pulling their weight in matters of security. He has repeatedly criticised nations for … Continue reading “Rising Sun? Japanese Politics and the Shifting Nature of the U.S.-Japan Alliance.”


The Road to Oligarchic Peace: Comparing the Nashville Conventions of 1850 and the Severodonetsk Congress of 2004

November 5, 2019

by Daria Platonova 5 November 2019 In March 1850, following a compromise motion on slavery tabled by Henry Clay in the US Congress and the debates that ensued John Calhoun, a statesman from the slave-holding state of South Carolina, threatened the “aggressive” North with southern secession if it continued to encroach upon the rights of … Continue reading “The Road to Oligarchic Peace: Comparing the Nashville Conventions of 1850 and the Severodonetsk Congress of 2004”


Positions open with Strife Editorial Board – Apply now!

September 16, 2019

16 September 2019     Strife is a dual-format publication founded in 2012 by PhD students and researchers from the War Studies Department of King’s College London. Comprised of an academic Blog and a peer-reviewed Journal, it is run by postgraduate students and doctoral researchers from the School of Security Studies. From its debut in … Continue reading “Positions open with Strife Editorial Board – Apply now!”


Conflict, Competition and Legitimacy: Holding on to the Memory of Aung San

August 15, 2019

by Anna Plunkett 16 August 2019   General Aung San is venerated throughout Burma as the father of the nation. He is remembered as a strong leader and switched on politician, remembered as a man of honour and loyalty that has awarded him the local title of Bogyoke. He was the leader of the Thirty … Continue reading “Conflict, Competition and Legitimacy: Holding on to the Memory of Aung San”


A Question of Leadership: Lessons from the UN’s Actions in Myanmar

August 12, 2019

by Gerrit Kurtz 13 August 2019   The UN’s inquiry into its own actions in Myanmar since 2012 draws significant parallels with a similar exercise that focused on the UN’s role during the end of the war in Sri Lanka. Once again, the UN found itself in a situation where a government was committing atrocities, … Continue reading “A Question of Leadership: Lessons from the UN’s Actions in Myanmar”


The Funding of Terrorism (Part IV) – A Trust Deficit is Undermining the Investigation of Terrorist Financing across MENA

August 9, 2019

by Jack Watling 10 August 2019   The Kingdom of Bahrain sentenced 139 people to prison in April 2019, alleging they were part of a terrorist cell, which the authorities refer to as ‘Bahraini Hezbollah’. The charges in the mass trial ranged from plotting to conduct attacks and the smuggling of arms, to terrorist financing. … Continue reading “The Funding of Terrorism (Part IV) – A Trust Deficit is Undermining the Investigation of Terrorist Financing across MENA”


The Funding of Terrorism (Part III) – America Needs a New Economic Patriot Act

August 6, 2019

by Michael Greenwald 8 August 2019   Since 9/11, Washington has deployed a powerful weapon to halt the financing of terrorism: Section 311 of the Patriot Act. By shutting down the ability of banks to facilitate cross-border payments, Section 311 has revolutionised the field of anti-money laundering while helping the U.S. implement aggressive and effective sanctions against Iran and North … Continue reading “The Funding of Terrorism (Part III) – America Needs a New Economic Patriot Act”


The Funding of Terrorism (Part II) – Terrorist Financing Hidden among Commercial Ties: Venezuela, Iran and Hezbollah

August 5, 2019

by Vanessa Neumann 6 August 2019   Venezuela, my country, is dying. Money has become worthless and we now face the biggest humanitarian disaster ever seen in the Western Hemisphere as the exodus will surpass Syria’s in 2020. The country is projected to lose a third of its population. One in three, and that number … Continue reading “The Funding of Terrorism (Part II) – Terrorist Financing Hidden among Commercial Ties: Venezuela, Iran and Hezbollah”


The Funding of Terrorism (Part I) – Hookahs and Honey: Funding Terrorism through ‘Benign’ Activities

August 3, 2019

by Ian Ralby 4 August 2019   Terrorism catches people’s attention, charcoal does not. It is a certitude much like the fact that a bomb blowing up a building will make international news and a fishing boat laden with jerry cans of diesel will not. Over the last decade, terrorist groups have increasingly sought to … Continue reading “The Funding of Terrorism (Part I) – Hookahs and Honey: Funding Terrorism through ‘Benign’ Activities”


Strife Series on The Funding of Terrorism – Introduction

July 31, 2019

by Alexandra Roberts 1 August 2019   Editorial We have all seen the outcome of violent acts of terrorism . The attacks of 11 September 2001 were among the largest coordinated assaults that had ever been carried out. In the near two decades that have since passed, there has been a sustained multi-national effort to … Continue reading “Strife Series on The Funding of Terrorism – Introduction”


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