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Does Malaysia have concrete counterterrorism strategies to mitigate potential terrorist attacks?

April 29, 2016

By: Munira Mustaffa While Indonesia successfully demonstrated remarkable resilience with her defiant cry of “Kami tidak takut” (“We are not intimidated”) on social media after the January 2016 attack,[1] there are some uncertainties that the same level of fortitude can be witnessed in Malaysia should a Daesh-inspired attack happen.[2] This raises some pressing debates about Malaysia’s … Continue reading “Does Malaysia have concrete counterterrorism strategies to mitigate potential terrorist attacks?”


The future of European defence: An interview with Daniel Keohane

April 25, 2016

Daniel Keohane interviewed by Annabelle Vuille Annabelle Vuille: What would you say are the most pressing security challenges faced by Europe today? Daniel Keohane: Let me answer this question slightly differently, as there are numerous security challenges to be listed – from Russia to ISIS, failing states in the Middle East, the refugee challenge, and terrorism etc. … Continue reading “The future of European defence: An interview with Daniel Keohane”


The limits of US security cooperation in Jordan

April 22, 2016

By: Peter Kirechu The most notable feature of President Barack Obama’s partnership-based counterterrorism doctrine­–roughly defined–is its central focus on training and arming local security services to independently deal with emerging terrorism threats. The President’s doctrine is unfortunately fraught with inconsistent performance of US-trained security services, especially among fragile states in the Middle East and beyond. … Continue reading “The limits of US security cooperation in Jordan”


Professor Kerry Brown on the rise of Xi Jinping: Power and politics in modern China

April 20, 2016

Interview with Professor Kerry Brown conducted by Lauren Dickey Lauren Dickey: What made you write `CEO China: The Rise of Xi Jinping’? Kerry Brown: This is the second in a trilogy of books on power and politics in contemporary China.  The first book, `The New Emperors: Power and the Princelings in China’, which came out … Continue reading “Professor Kerry Brown on the rise of Xi Jinping: Power and politics in modern China”


Book review: ‘The Global Village Myth: Distance, War, and the Limits of Power’ by Patrick Porter

April 19, 2016

By: Yuji Develle Patrick Porter. The Global Village Myth: Distance, War and the Limits of Power. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press/ distr. by Hurst and Co, 2015. ISBN: 978-18-49-04544-5. Pp. 242. Paperback. £17.99. The Global Village Myth attacks ‘globalist’ thinking head-on and arrives at no better time. An empirically backed assault on how contemporary neo-liberal … Continue reading “Book review: ‘The Global Village Myth: Distance, War, and the Limits of Power’ by Patrick Porter”


Art, conflict, and the everyday – Traces of War launch event

April 18, 2016

By: Laurie Benson Wednesday 13th April marked the launch of the Leverhulme Artist-in-Residence hosted by the Arts and Conflict Hub and Research Centre in International Relations, Department of War Studies, King’s College London. The residency features the artist Baptist Coelho who introduced his artistic practice at the event. An exhibition entitled ‘Traces of War’ will … Continue reading “Art, conflict, and the everyday – Traces of War launch event”


Putin’s sleight of hand in Syria

April 15, 2016

By: Peter Kirechu On March 14, Russian President Vladimir Putin unexpectedly announced the withdrawal of Russian forces from Syria as UN-sponsored peace talks began in Geneva. Putin’s withdrawal–however partial–challenged the Obama administration’s long-held quagmire sentence on the Russian role inside Syria. Putin showed that a limited military campaign could preserve the regime from collapse without … Continue reading “Putin’s sleight of hand in Syria”


A ‘Second Hezbollah’: The strategic value of Iran’s proxy warfare policy in Syria

April 13, 2016

By: Robert Andrea Throughout the past thirty years, Iran has arguably been the world’s foremost expert in the use of so-called ‘proxy’ warfare as a tool of statecraft. Whether in Lebanon, Gaza, Yemen, or Iraq, Tehran has displayed a degree of discipline about its use of ‘proxy’ sponsorship hitherto unmatched by few, if any, other … Continue reading “A ‘Second Hezbollah’: The strategic value of Iran’s proxy warfare policy in Syria”


Attacks on undersea cables: a Victorian legacy

April 12, 2016

By: James Fargher In October 2015 The New York Times reported on heightened US concerns about Russian submarines near undersea internet cables.[1] Citing unnamed intelligence officials and diplomats, the article highlighted growing fears that Russian submarines could sever the cables which pipe 95% of the internet around the world.[2] The piece prompted a flurry of … Continue reading “Attacks on undersea cables: a Victorian legacy”


Tackling Iraq’s Shia Militia Crisis

April 11, 2016

By: Peter Kirechu Iraqi security forces are engaged in a contentious fight against a determined and effective foe in the self-styled Islamic State (also referred to as IS, ISIS, ISIL, or Daesh). Iraq’s security sector, while resilient in the face of tens of thousands of jihadist militants has nonetheless required substantial external assistance from the … Continue reading “Tackling Iraq’s Shia Militia Crisis”


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