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Is democratic peace theory undermined on the cyber battlefield?

October 30, 2015

By: Archie Jobson Remote Control is a project hosted by the London-based think tank Oxford Research Group, set up to examine changes in military engagement, in particular the use of drones, special forces, private military companies and cyber warfare. They recently hosted an essay competition for participants in response to the question ‘Is remote control effective in solving … Continue reading “Is democratic peace theory undermined on the cyber battlefield?”


The Question of Limited Intervention in Syria: ‘And Then What?’

October 26, 2015

By: Alexander Decina Given the atrocities witnessed during the course of the Syrian civil war—be it the Bashar al-Assad regime’s use of barrel bombs or the depravity of the so-called Islamic State—it is hardly surprising to hear continued frustration at U.S. and Western inaction. Some have estimated the death toll to be higher than 250,000—a number … Continue reading “The Question of Limited Intervention in Syria: ‘And Then What?’”


Many Problems with Neighbours: The Ankara Attack and the Fragility of the Erdoğan Era

October 21, 2015

By: Jackson Webster On October 10th 2015, two suicide bombings shook Ankara, the Turkish capital, killing almost 100 Turks and wounding hundreds more. As if the death toll was not tragic enough, the victims of the explosions were peace demonstrators. The march in Ankara last Saturday was protesting the current government’s refusal to accept the … Continue reading “Many Problems with Neighbours: The Ankara Attack and the Fragility of the Erdoğan Era”


Canada Needs to Rethink Foreign Policy: Peacekeeping isn’t the Answer

October 20, 2015

By: Zachary Wolfraim The election of Justin Trudeau and the Liberal Party on 19 October marks the end of a decade of Prime Minister Harper’s dominance in Ottawa. After a grueling 78-day campaign, voters convincingly rejected the Harper government and put a majority Liberal government in place for the first time in 15 years. This … Continue reading “Canada Needs to Rethink Foreign Policy: Peacekeeping isn’t the Answer”


Is remote control effective in solving security problems?

By: Chad Daniel Tumelty Editors note: Remote Control is a project hosted by the London-based think tank Oxford Research Group, set up to examine changes in military engagement, in particular the use of drones, special forces, private military companies and cyber warfare. They recently hosted an essay competition for participants in response to the question ‘Is remote control effective in … Continue reading “Is remote control effective in solving security problems?”


NATO, State (Re)emergence, and Military Capabilities and Commitments: the Terms of the Debate

October 19, 2015

By: Alex Calvo   The possible (re)emergence of states within NATO, at a time of renewed international tensions and widespread concern over the capabilities and commitments of existing member states, means that any such country seeking recognition will have to answer a fundamental question: will the combined capabilities and commitments of the two resulting successor … Continue reading “NATO, State (Re)emergence, and Military Capabilities and Commitments: the Terms of the Debate”


IDPs in Iraq and the progress of the Islamic State: An interview with Hebatalla Taha (IISS)

October 14, 2015

By: Jack Curran-Persell Hebatalla Taha is a Research Analyst for the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS) in London where she focuses on the Middle-East and North Africa. Jack Curran-Persell: Earlier this month, you wrote a very interesting article for IISS on the situation for IDPs in Iraq. With the UN estimating over 3 million Iraqis have … Continue reading “IDPs in Iraq and the progress of the Islamic State: An interview with Hebatalla Taha (IISS)”


Schengen and free circulation at the crossroads: lessons for the East African Community?

October 6, 2015

By Moses Onyango and Jean-Marc Trouille: In many parts of the world, geopolitics is confronted with two contending trends. On the one hand, numerous countries are engaged in a process of regional economic integration, epitomised by the more advanced model of the European Union (EU), which requires ‘internal’ borders between participating states to become more … Continue reading “Schengen and free circulation at the crossroads: lessons for the East African Community?”


Malaysia's Daesh problem: extremism in the shadow of moderation

October 1, 2015

By Munira Mustaffa: Regional analysts and Western pundits may be inclined to wonder why Daesh’s[1] influence still persists in Malaysia, despite concerted efforts to combat the group.[2] The answer lies in the fact that with a population of approximately 240 million Muslims in the region, Southeast Asia is an ideal ground for Daesh’s radicalisation ventures. … Continue reading “Malaysia's Daesh problem: extremism in the shadow of moderation”


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