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The unforgiven: How do soldiers live with their guilt?

April 28, 2014

By Kevin Sites: When soldiers kill in war, the secret shame and guilt they bring back home can destroy them November 2004, against a shattered wall in south Fallujah in Iraq, with video rolling, I conduct a battlefield interview with US Marine Corporal William Wold. He has just shot six men dead inside a room … Continue reading “The unforgiven: How do soldiers live with their guilt?”


Syria, foreign fighters and the Met's new campaign

April 25, 2014

In response to the April 24th launch of a national campaign aimed at starting the conversation about protecting young people from the dangers of travelling to Syria by the Metropolitan Police, Jill S. Russell discusses the role of academia in such initiatives, while Joana Cook analyses the implications of focusing on women. Not the wrong … Continue reading “Syria, foreign fighters and the Met's new campaign”


No guts, no glory

April 24, 2014

By Matthew Bell: Would an independent Scotland be missing some essential body parts? How do you create a new country? Not a question many of us have had to ask, but one surely on the minds of thousands of Brits worrying what independence would mean for the security we have all come to take for … Continue reading “No guts, no glory”


May 14, A Strife-RCIR event: "The Fog of Peace: The New Face of Conflict Resolution." A conversation with Giandomenico Picco and Gabrielle Rifkind

April 22, 2014

  Gabrielle Rifkind and Giandomenico Picco: ‘The Fog of Peace: The New Face of Conflict Resolution’. Event chaired by Dr. Jack Spence OBE Wednesday, 14 May 5:00 – 6:30, Pyramid Room (K4U.04), King’s Building, Strand Campus, King’s College London. WC2R 2LS. Wine reception and book signing to follow. Event by Strife Blog and RCIR Institutions do not … Continue reading “May 14, A Strife-RCIR event: "The Fog of Peace: The New Face of Conflict Resolution." A conversation with Giandomenico Picco and Gabrielle Rifkind”


Drones series, Part V. The biopolitics of drone warfare

By Daniel Møller Ølgaard: The current debate on armed Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), also known as drones, focuses mostly on legal implications and moral implications of their use. Issues such as civilian deaths, as well as the strategic implications and tactical advantages of drones are reigning supreme in the academic and public discussions. Yet these … Continue reading “Drones series, Part V. The biopolitics of drone warfare”


Drones series, Part IV. ‘May you die in a drone strike’: Yemen, AQAP and the US drone program

April 18, 2014

By Dr Victoria Fontan: Drones are slowly making their way into our modern lives. They can now deliver books, medical marijuana, or beer to sailors at sea. In the next few years, drones will dramatically change our lives. Farea al-Muslimi, a Yemeni youth activist, explains how they have already changed the social fabric of his … Continue reading “Drones series, Part IV. ‘May you die in a drone strike’: Yemen, AQAP and the US drone program”


Can digital currencies challenge the status quo?

April 16, 2014

By Michael Jefferson: Increasing international trade, multi-currency holding, public distrust in the banking system and a regulatory barriers that are seen to hinder the free-flow of capital. All of these suggest that a global digital currency, one that is not linked to a particular sovereign state or the fortunes of a company, is a natural … Continue reading “Can digital currencies challenge the status quo?”


Drones series, Part III. War, peace and the spaces in between: Drones in international law

April 15, 2014

By Dr. Jack McDonald: The Legal Regulation of UAVs Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs)[1] don’t have to be used as weapons, but military UAVs require the same regulation as any other weapon system. Since the American use of UAVs to conduct targeted killings of people it defines as militants and terrorists, activists in a number of … Continue reading “Drones series, Part III. War, peace and the spaces in between: Drones in international law”


Drones series, Part II: Daring to use drones. Why targeted killings are a necessary component in modern counter-insurgency campaigns

April 10, 2014

By David C. Hofmann: Fuelled by the global ‘war on terror’ that emerged in the aftermath of the 9/11 and 7/7 attacks, Western democracies have been steadily increasing their use of drone strikes to kill key operational and ideological members within insurgent groups in Yemen, Pakistan, Afghanistan and elsewhere. The state-sanctioned and strategic targeted killing … Continue reading “Drones series, Part II: Daring to use drones. Why targeted killings are a necessary component in modern counter-insurgency campaigns”


Drones series, Part I: Pakistan's decade of drones (2004-2014)

April 8, 2014

By Zoha Waseem: ‘Things fall out of the sky’ In June 2004, the first drone strike in Pakistan targeted a man who had rejected peace agreements with the government, sworn allegiance to the Taliban, and vowed to continue his ‘jihad’ against the United States in Afghanistan. The Pakistani military initially claimed responsibility for Nek Mohammad’s … Continue reading “Drones series, Part I: Pakistan's decade of drones (2004-2014)”


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